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The unit gives an overview of some of the major theological themes of the Old Testament (OT).  It discusses topics such as God’s revelation, creation, human failure, divine judgment and the unfolding redemptive purposes of God for humankind.  Attention is given to God’s election of, and covenant with, Israel, suffering and death, and to the OT hope for the future.  Throughout the unit students are encouraged to think through the implications of their studies for God’s people today and to consider whether the OT has a central theme.

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The unit explores the background and genre of Revelation and introduces the student to some of the different approaches to its interpretation.  The whole text is studied chapter by chapter, and the unit concludes by considering the theological message of Revelation and its contribution to Christian theology and ethics.

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Starting with brief orientations on the discipline of Biblical Theology and on the relationship between OT and NT, this unit reviews the major theological contributions within the NT (Matthew, Luke, John, Paul, Hebrews, Peter).  Issues such as salvation history, unity and diversity, and NT ethics receive specific attention.  The students are encouraged to think through the implications of the biblical texts for God’s people today and they will increase their skills in interpretation and application.

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The development of the Church’s understanding of the person and work of the Holy Spirit is considered with particular reference to the relationship between creation and redemption, to the relationship between justification and sanctification, and to the evaluation of what is called religious experience.  The unit then explores theological claims that human agency and responsibility should be understood as dependent on the theology of the Holy Spirit, illustrating these by reference to issues of scientific development, medical and business ethics.  Particular emphasis is given to the Spirit’s role in creation and redemption, to claims that Christian ethics can be described as eucharistic, and to the notion of human agency within creation.

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Developments in Britain which receive attention in this unit are the causes, progress and results of the evangelical revival; Anglican evangelicalism and the Clapham Sect; the Oxford Movement in the Church of England; the Christian Socialist tradition; Free Churches and the social gospel; the influence of the holiness movements; Mission in the nineteenth century and its relationship to ecumenism in the twentieth century; evangelical identity in the twentieth century; and the world-wide growth of Pentecostalism and of charismatic movements. Wider topics are included, such as renewal movements in Europe, Christianity in North America, and features within Roman Catholicism in Europe, with particular reference to the effects of Vatican II.

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The unit begins with an examination of the biblical foundations for a theology of mission.  It considers some of the ways in which the Church’s understanding and practice of theology have developed, and explores selected topics such as the development of integral mission and the interaction between gospel and culture.  It also examines some of the theological issues raised by the practice of mission in a religiously plural context.  Students are encouraged to develop and justify a contemporary theology of mission which takes account of the issues studied.

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This unit provides an opportunity for extended independent study.  Following a dissertation study day, students submit a formal proposal.  The topic and approach must be approved by the teaching staff.  A supervisor will be allocated according to the subject of the work.  Dissertations will be submitted in accordance with the requirements in the College’s Dissertation Handbook.

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Students choose, with the approval of the programme leader, a topic which they wish to
explore in depth. They are not permitted to take this unit alongside a taught unit on the
same subject at Level 6. The topic must be appropriate to an undergraduate degree, draw
upon the skills previously gained by the student, be based on an adequate body of
knowledge, be based on adequate and accessible resources, and be capable of being
supervised by a member of the teaching staff.


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Students choose, with the approval of the programme leader, a topic related to any of the units offered at Level 6 which they wish to explore in depth.  They are not permitted to take this unit alongside a taught unit on the same subject at Level 6.  The topic must be appropriate to an undergraduate degree, draw upon the skills previously gained by the student, be based on an adequate body of knowledge, be based on adequate and accessible resources, and be capable of being supervised by a member of the teaching staff.

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